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#BuyThisBook: memoirista Jen Lancaster creates suburban mayhem in debut novel "If You Were Here"


Jen Lancaster, New York Times bestselling author of Such a Pretty Fat and My Fair Lazy makes her fiction debut next week with If You Were Here. If the book is as entertaining as the trailer, I think I'm going to like it! (I'll let you know.)

Per the PR:
Told in the uproariously entertaining voice readers have come to expect from Jen Lancaster, If You Were Here follows Amish-zombie-teen- romance author Mia and her husband Mac (and their pets) through the alternately frustrating, exciting, terrifying-but always funny-process of buying and renovating their first home in the Chicago suburbs that John hughes's movies made famous. Along their harrowing renovation journey, Mia and Mac get caught up in various wars with the homeowners' association, meet some less-than-friendly neighbors, and are joined by a hilarious cast of supporting characters, including a celebutard ex- landlady. As they struggle to adapt to their new surroundings- with Mac taking on the renovations himself- Mia and Mac will discover if their marriage is strong enough to survive months of DIY renovations.

Comments

"Mia and Mac will decide if their marriage is strong enough to survive months of DIY restorations."

Um . . . that one hits just a little too close to home. It does sound hilarious, though. Maybe when I come up for air (have hard-core revision deadline and firm target date for query!), I can read this. And maybe by then Mark will be done converting the garage into his "man cave." ;)
Months, and months, and months . . . ;)
Joni Rodgers said…
Dr KatPat, I immediately thought of you when I heard from her PR diva about this book!

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